Traditional Commentary No. 29

The Four Major Judicial Innovations of China’s Guangzhou Internet Court*

Date of Publication:
2019/09/15
Author(s):
  • Dr. GUO Wenli, General Manager, Legal Business Department, Beiming Software Co., Ltd. (“Beiming”); Dean, Beiming’s Research Institute for Social Governance Theory and Business Innovation

Commentary

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Abstract

The Guangzhou Internet Court has actively explored and contributed, within a year, four major judicial innovations regarding online dispute resolution in China: the Online Diversified Dispute Resolution Platform, the Smart Credit Ecosystem with the Network-Law Chain, unmanned court E-legal pavilions, and the Smart System for the Bulk Adjudication of Similar Cases.

These judicial innovations are important applications of Internet technology and artificial intelligence to the dispute resolution field, enriching the practice of online dispute resolution.  They provide safeguards for parties to enjoy convenient, efficient, and professional judicial services; open paths for law firms, notaries, and other judicial service institutions to participate in online dispute resolution; and create a rule-of-law business environment for business operators, thereby enhancing their economic vitality.  Based on the data cited in this commentary, these four major judicial innovations are well-functioning and successful, and will bring a unique Chinese experience to the exploration of online dispute resolution around the world.


Introduction

[…]

Online Diversified Dispute Resolution Platform

“From its launch on March 2, 2019 to August 26 of the same year, […] 17,508 cases accepted for mediation, 16,501 successful mediations, and a mediation success rate as high as 94 percent.”

[…]

Smart Credit Ecosystem with the Network-Law Chain

[…]

Unmanned Court E-Legal Pavilions

“From [the] introduction [of E-legal pavilions] on May 28, 2019 through August 26 of the same year, […] 3,305 self-service cases were registered […]. There were 152 online mediation disputes, 6,671 people were served with documents online […].”

[…]

Smart System for the Bulk Adjudication of Similar Cases 

[…]

Conclusion

[…]


Author’s Bio

Dr. GUO Wenli
General Manager, Legal Business Department, Beiming Software Co., Ltd. (“Beiming”)
Dean, Beiming’s Research Institute for Social Governance Theory and Business Innovation

Dr. GUO Wenli previously served as a judge at the Intermediate People’s Court of Huzhou Municipality, Zhejiang Province, as a member of the court’s Adjudication Committee, and as director of the court’s Research Office.  He was seconded to work at the Supreme People’s Court in 2017.  From May 2018 to the present, Dr. Guo has served as general manager of the Legal Business Department of Beiming Software Co., Ltd. (http://www.bmsoft.com.cn), where he is responsible for legal and technological product innovation, and for actively promoting online dispute resolution in China.  At the same time, as dean of the company’s Research Institute for Social Governance Theory and Business Innovation, Dr. Guo researches and explores the application of information technology such as big data, cloud computing, and blockchain to the judicial field, and incorporates the latest social governance policies and theories to optimize social governance methods, advance smart governance work, and contribute to China’s creation of a modern social governance structure.

In addition, Dr. Guo is an adjunct researcher at the National Rule of Law Index Research Center of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, a part-time graduate student supervisor at Guanghua Law School of Zhejiang University, and a legislative expert on the Standing Committee of the People’s Congress of Huzhou Municipality, Zhejiang Province.  He also actively participates in cutting-edge theoretical research, teaching, and local legislative work on online dispute resolution.

Endnotes

* The citation of this Commentary is: Dr. GUO Wenli, The Four Major Judicial Innovations of China’s Guangzhou Internet Court, 6 China Law Connect 1 (Sept. 2019), also available at Stanford Law School China Guiding Cases Project, Sept. 2019, http://cgc.law.stanford.edu/commentaries/clc-6-201909-29-guo-wenli.  The original, Chinese version of this Commentary was edited by Rainy Ruoyu Ren, Baneoss Xinyue Zhu, and Dr. Mei Gechlik.  The English version was prepared by Haoxuan Cheng, Straton Papagianneas, Jeremy Schlosser, Haiyun Zhang, and Baneoss Xinyue Zhu, and was finalized by Jeremy Schlosser, Nathan Harpainter, and Dr. Mei Gechlik.  The information and views set out in this Commentary are the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect the work or views of the China Guiding Cases Project.